Let’s talk about Passover desserts

Why do so many non-Jewish publications include dairy desserts on their Passover menus?!
Matzah bark, crackle or chocolate covered... it's an acquired taste.

From the classic cholesterol packed macaroon, to the more often used than not flourless chocolate cake, Passover desserts can be a love it or hate it addition to your seder table.

Passover desserts can be fun but they all have on thing in common– no flour (and for some Orthodox Jews no matzah can be used until the last night of Passover).

We broke down some our favorite parve Passover recipes (why do so many non-Jewish publications include dairy desserts on their Passover menus?!*) by type to save you the hassle of searching around.

Cakes

Flourless Chocolate Cake with fresh raspberries.

Flourless cakes are popular in many cuisines due to their more dense and fudge-like consistency.

Ice cream/Sorbet/Mousse/Custard

Assorted sorbets

Sorbets, custards and curds are extremely easy to make.

Cookies

The coconut macaroon is a Passover classic.

Something different

Honestly, if you don’t keep to gebrochts (not soaking your matzah until the last night) chocolate covered matzah dipped in anything is the best.

*Traditional Jews do not mix milk and meat in a meal and typically wait 3-6 hours after eating meat before eating something that has dairy in it.